Experiential High School Career Education, Self-Efficacy, and Motivation

  • Lisa Gaylor University of Saskatchewan
  • Jennifer J. Nicol University of Saskatchewan

Abstract

Students’ perceived self-efficacy and motivation in the context of experiential high school career education was examined through an exploratory mixed methods case study of an elective experiential career education class offered in Saskatchewan public schools. Data were generated by having students (N = 14) complete two measures at the start and end of the semester: the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale—Short Form (CDMES-SF) (Taylor & Betz, 1983) and an adapted motivation questionnaire (Kerner, 2011). Classroom assignments, curriculum documents, and interviews with the instructor and two of the students provided further sources of data. Qualitative data were analyzed thematically and quantitative data were analyzed using dependent-t-testing. Significant differences in CDMSE-SF scores were identified and common themes emerged across the qualitative data. Findings are discussed as they relate to social cognitive theory, self-determination theory, and implications for practice and future research.

Author Biographies

Lisa Gaylor, University of Saskatchewan

Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education

Jennifer J. Nicol, University of Saskatchewan

Associate Professor

Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education

Published
2016-06-22
How to Cite
Gaylor, L., & Nicol, J. J. (2016). Experiential High School Career Education, Self-Efficacy, and Motivation. Canadian Journal of Education/Revue Canadienne De l’éducation, 39(2), 1-24. Retrieved from https://journals.sfu.ca/cje/index.php/cje-rce/article/view/2029
Section
Articles