A REVIEW OF “ANTI-PREDATOR DISTRACTION” DISPLAY BEHAVIOR OF BIRDS OF THE FAMILY CONOPOPHAGIDAE, WITH THE FIRST PHOTOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTATION FOR THE RUFOUS GNATEATER (CONOPOPHAGA LINEATA)

Fabio Schunck, Peter Mix

Abstract


“Anti-predator distraction” display behavior is well known for birds of the families Charadriidae and Scolopacidae, but it is also performed by Neotropical forest birds of the family Conopophagidae. Nevertheless, this information is rarely mentioned in compilations on the subject and in reference works. Thus, in order to make such information available, we present a compilation of published data and a documented field record of “anti-predator distraction” display behavior for the family Conopophagidae. Data were obtained through bibliographical research and searches in online ornithological data platforms. We found 12 studies with reports of this behavior for the family Conopophagidae, all of which were for the genus Conopophaga. The field record was obtained in a natural area located near the city of São Paulo in Southeast Brazil. An adult male Rufous Gnateater, Conopophaga lineata, was observed and documented performing a “broken-wing” display behavior to protect a young hatchling. The performance of “anti-predator distraction” by most species of the genus Conopophaga may be associated with high rates of nest or fledgling predation, or even be an inheritance from already extinct ancestral groups. Even though it is an apparently common behavior for this genus, there is still no specific study on “anti-predator distraction” display behavior of Neotropical forest birds, which represents a significant information gap. It is important to better understand this type of behavior and protect the natural areas were these birds of the family Conopophagidae occur.

Keywords


Atlantic Forest, behavior, natural history

Full Text:

PDF

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.