“I Started out as a Social Constructionist”: A Conversation with Myra J. Hird, Part 1

  • Rebecca Scott Dept. of Sociology, Queen’s University

Abstract

As a student of Communication, I have come to understand the field as being principally concerned with the symbolic world. Thus we see cultural studies, news and media studies, and language studies and linguistics as defining traditions; discourse and textual analysis as defining methods; and social construction as a defining theoretical approach. Yet the field has been defined in a number of ways which can vary drastically or conflict with one another. Rather than seeing this as a serious problem of identity, I suggest that, quite possibly, this is Communication’s most productive feature. Being interdisciplinary, transdisciplinary, or whatever you would like to call it, Communication has the distinct advantage of being relatively free from the binding constrictions of older, more established disciplines. This means the field is at the forefront of producing novel research.
How to Cite
Scott, R. (1). “I Started out as a Social Constructionist”: A Conversation with Myra J. Hird, Part 1. Stream: Interdisciplinary Journal of Communication, 1(2), 23–37. Retrieved from https://journals.sfu.ca/stream/index.php/stream/article/view/27