Introducing Real-Time Indeterminate Synthetic Music Feedback (RT-ISMF) as a Therapeutic Intervention Method

Iebele Abel

Abstract


Started in 2007, partly unpublished artistic research has resulted in the development of a Psi-related collection of methods and instruments, which features possible applications in healing and therapeutic intervention2. This article will introduce this collection of methods and instruments, under the name Real-time Indeterminate Synthetic Music Feedback (RT-ISMF). The ISMF system generates indeterminate music by transforming quantum noise signals from a REG (random event generator) into uniformly distributed musical scales, note durations, and note values. The music produced in this way may serve as a continuous micro-PK feedback system, in which the music is the carrier of information produced by the REG (see illustration 1). Listeners to ISFM music have reported deep relaxation in short times. Dream-like images, visions, voices, and sudden insights are experienced, most of them connected in a remarkably meaningful way to important issues in the individual’s life. Since 2008, ISMF has been used during formal and informal therapeutic settings like psychological intervention, individual empowerment, relaxation and ‘healing.’ Evidence for possible applicability as a therapeutic intervention method has been collected from case studies and group events during which ISMF music was central. Case studies show that ISMF may be an effective intervention for a broad range of psychological, yet unclassified discomforts. Combinations of ‘exceptional experiences’ as well as spiritual and bodily healing are reported. ISMF and the supporting therapeutic interviewing technique have not been documented in publications so far. This article sketches the history, the design and theoretical background of ISMF. Case studies in which ISMF was central are summarized.

Keywords


Psychotherapy; Real-time Indeterminate Synthetic Music Feedback; random event generator; quantum noise signals; PK feedback

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References


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