Administrator Perceptions of School Improvement Policies in a High-Impact Policy Setting

Mario S. Torres, Luana Zellner, David Erlandson

Abstract


This study investigated school administrators’ perceptions of school improvement policies in a high-impact policy environment by measuring the impact of accountability, site-based management, professional development, and scheduling reform on the three dependent variables of a) academic outcomes, b) staff morale, and c) parent and community involvement. Using a convenience sampling method, 49 public school principals from Texas participated and an online survey was constructed to gather both quantitative (i.e., Likert scale) and qualitative (i.e., open ended response) data. The findings clearly point to principals, regardless of geographical district type and grade level school type, viewing less controversial and more intrinsically oriented policies (i.e., site-based management and professional development) as having a greater positive impact on outcomes as a whole than more radical alternatives (i.e., accountability and time and schedule reform). The evidence suggests that more aggressive school improvement policy approaches are likely failing to generate enough convincing outcomes to generate high commitment and confidence from school leaders. Further studies may look at the interaction of policy impact with minority student enrollments and with subgroup populations.

Keywords


school improvement, policy, accountability, administrator perceptions, leadership

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.22230/ijepl.2008v3n7a127

Copyright (c) 2015 Mario S. Torres, Luana Zellner, David Erlandson

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