Frontline Learning Research https://journals.sfu.ca/flr/index.php/journal <p>Frontline Learning Research (FLR) welcomes risk-taking and explorative studies that provide input for theoretical, empirical and/or methodological renewal within the field of research on learning and instruction. The journal offers a distinctive opening for foundational research and an arena for studies that promote new ideas, methodologies or discoveries. Read about what is frontline under <a href="https://journals.sfu.ca/flr/index.php/journal/about" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Aims and scope</a></p> en-US <p>FLR adopts the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs Creative Common License (BY-NC-ND). That is, Copyright for articles published in this journal is retained by the authors with, however, first publication rights granted to the journal. By virtue of their appearance in this open access journal, articles are free to use, with proper attribution, in educational and other non-commercial settings.</p> nina.dohn@frontlinelearningresearch.org (Nina B. Dohn) info@frontlinelearningresearch.org (Lore Verschakelen) Fri, 09 Sep 2022 07:38:46 -0700 OJS 3.3.0.10 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 A Multidimensional Framework of Collaborative Groups’ Disciplinary Engagement https://journals.sfu.ca/flr/index.php/journal/article/view/863 <p>Abstract</p> <p style="font-weight: 400;">This research is aimed at developing novel theory to advance innovative methods for examining how collaborative groups progress toward productively engaging during classroom activity that integrates disciplinary practices. This work draws on a situative perspective, along with prior framings of individual engagement, to conceptualize engagement as a shared and multidimensional phenomenon. A multidimensional conceptualization affords the study of distinct engagement dimensions, as well as the interrelationships of engagement dimensions that together are productive. Development and exploration of an observational rubric evaluating collaborative group disciplinary engagement (GDE) is presented, leveraging the benefits of observational methods with a rubric specifying quality ratings, enabling the potential for analyses of larger samples more efficiently than prior approaches, but with similar ability to richly characterize the shared and multidimensional nature of group engagement. Mixed-methods analyses, including case illustrations and profile analysis, showcase the synergistic interrelations among engagement dimensions constituting GDE. The rubric effectively captured engagement features that could be identified via intensive video analysis, while affording the evaluation of broader claims about group engagement patterns. Application of the rubric across curricular contexts, and within and between lessons across a curricular unit, will enable comparative studies that can inform theory about collaborative engagement, as well as instructional design and practice.</p> Toni Kempler Rogat, Cindy E. Hmelo-Silver, Britte Haugan Cheng, Anne Traynor, Temitope F. Adeoye, Andrea Gomoll, Brenda K Downing Copyright (c) 2022 Frontline Learning Research https://journals.sfu.ca/flr/index.php/journal/article/view/863 Fri, 09 Sep 2022 00:00:00 -0700 New Materialist Network Approaches in Science Education: A Method to Construct Network Data from Video https://journals.sfu.ca/flr/index.php/journal/article/view/949 <p>Lately, new materialism has been proposed as a theoretical framework to better understand material-dialogic relationships in learning, and concurrently network analysis has emerged as a method in science education research. This paper explores how to include materiality in network analysis and reports the development of a method to construct network data from video. The approaches, 1) information flow, 2) material semantic and 3) material engagement, were identified based on the literature on network analysis and new materialism in science education. The method was applied and further improved with a video segment from an upper secondary school physics lesson. The example networks from the video segment show that network analysis is a potential research method within the materialist framework and that the method allows studies into the material and dialogic relationships that emerge when students are engaged in investigations in school.</p> Miikka Turkkila, Jari Lavonen, Katariina Salmela-Aro, Kalle Juuti Copyright (c) 2022 Frontline Learning Research https://journals.sfu.ca/flr/index.php/journal/article/view/949 Tue, 18 Oct 2022 00:00:00 -0700