Effects Of A Collaborative, Technology-based Intervention Involving School Principals To Retain Early-career Teachers: A Scaled, Quantitative Research Study

James A. Martinez, Frederick L. Uy, Cathy Williams

Abstract


Statistics have shown that at least 50% of all teachers leave the profession within the first five years, with higher departure rates in certain subjects (e.g. science and mathematics, special education, English language development) (Ingersoll, 2003) and in under-resourced schools with traditionally underserved students of color (Redding & Henry, 2018). Moreover, lack of administrative support is cited as a significant factor in teacher job satisfaction (Borman & Dowling, 2008; Donaldson, 2013). To investigate principal and early-career teacher attitudes regarding support, an intervention was conducted to investigate the degree that a single, brief meeting involving school principals and their early-career teachers had on feelings of support. Informing policy-makers and practitioners alike, results of this pilot study indicated that, 45 days after the intervention, teacher and principal participants reported a general increase in perceived levels of support, relative to control participants.


Keywords


administrator, teacher, retention, intervention, survey, support, technology

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